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Boss or No Boss (Managers, Part II)

So long, 'Arry!

So long, ‘Arry!

Harry Redknapp’s resignation as Queens Park Rangers’ boss likely means the end of his 32-year managerial career. Despite his colourful quotes and allegedly dubious transfer dealings, the man was still a winner… sometimes. He did take a flailing Portsmouth team, save them from the drop, and then went on to win the 2008 FA Cup (the last English manager to win a major English trophy). While ‘Arry found work… these guys are still looking for jobs.

vahidd1Vahid Halilodžić
Age: 62
Nationality: Bosnian
Honours: 2004 Coupe de France with PSG

Vahid Halilodžić is probably known more in the present day for what he didn’t win than what he did. The Bosnian should be feted in Algeria for bringing that country farther than it’s ever gone in a World Cup. The men in green played well in Brazil, pushing Germany to extra-time before the eventual champions came out ahead, 2-1. He then resigned in tears, blaming a resentful populace and media for unconscionably castigating him, despite his results.

Halilodžić’s accomplishments have been quiet, yet solid. He coached Lille OSC through promotion in 2000, and then into third place the next season; they’ve been up and competitive almost every season since (except this one). His move to PSG in 2004 resulted in winning the Coupe de France at first go, and propelled the club into second place. Although his second season resulted in his dismissal, his stints as coach of the Côte d’Ivoire (where he was dismissed despite qualifying for the 2010 World Cup) and Algeria national teams showed that he is capable of leading teams on the big stage.

glacombe_921161139

France’s answer to Tom Skerritt…

Guy Lacombe
Age: 59
Nationality: French
Honours: 2006 Coupe de France with PSG

Guy Lacombe became something of a cup specialist, winning the 2004 French League Cup with Sochaux in their second straight final. He then moved to Paris Saint-Germain and won the Coupe de France in his first season in the capital. However, his league results were middling at best… but he moved onto Rennes and Monaco, leading each side to the French Cup finals in 2009 and 2010, respectively. By January 2011 though, Monaco was in 17th place and Lacombe was fired.  Les Rouges et Blancs never recovered and were sent to Ligue 2.  Lacombe now works for France’s National Technical Director, François Blaquart.

Felix-Magath_EPA_2846160bFelix Magath
Age: 61
Nationality: German
Honours: 2005 & 2006 Bundesliga titles, 2005 & 2006 DfB Pokal winners with Bayern Munich; 2009 Bundesliga title with Wolfsburg

Few managers have as much pedigree as both a player and a coach as Felix Magath. Few managers inspire as much dread amongst players as well. As a player, Magath won every major European trophy, save the UEFA Cup (although he was in a final), with the mighty Hamburger SV team of the late 70s and early 80s.  He was also a member of the West German side that won the 1980 European Championship.  As a coach, he won successive league-cup doubles with Bayern Munich in 2005 and 2006; three years later, he won the league again, this time with Wolfsburg.

But then you hear the stories about his training regimens, his falling out with players, his desire for absolute control. Fulham loanee Lewis Holtby was reportedly aghast when he found out that his former tormentor was taking over at Craven Cottage. But “Saddam” could not save Fulham from the drop, and now no club in Germany wants him back.  Still… some English club must need a good ol’ fashioned spanking.

MazzarriWalter Mazzarri
Age: 53
Nationality: Italian
Honours: 2012 Coppa Italia with Napoli

Before Walter Mazzarri, Napoli’s recent history was not great. Relegated in 1998, promoted in 2000, and then relegated again right away, Gli Azzurri slipped into insolvency and oblivion. The team reformed in 2004 in Serie C1 and took four years to climb back into the top flight. Enter Mazzarri a year later. He brought them into the Europa League at his first go. The next year, it was the Champions League.  The year after that, Napoli won the Coppa Italia.  He topped that by leading Napoli to second place; they were never going to challenge Juventus, but they certainly beat traditional powerhouse AC Milan, along with upstarts Fiorentina.  After that season, Mazzarri bizarrely decided to take over at diminishing Inter Milan.  That lasted five months.  Cavoli!

VictorMunoz-reacts121201R300Victor Muñoz
Age: 57
Nationality: Spanish
Honours: 2004 Copa del Rey with Real Zaragoza

Victor’s managerial league record is not great. The former Barcelona, Sampdoria and Spain star couldn’t replicate his success as a player. He was in charge of several middling La Liga teams, along with stints in Greece, Chechnya (replacing Ruud Gullit at Terek Grozny) and Switzerland. But in January 2004, he stepped into the manager role mid-season at his boyhood club, Real Zaragoza and led them past Barcelone in the 2004 Copa del Rey quarterfinals, before taking out Real Madrid in the final. He would return to the Aragonese side last spring and then leave only eight months later. But for a brief moment 11 years ago, Victor was the King of Spain.

Coming Up: A man who’s name is synonymous with collapse in London and Madrid, and another who’s name means collapse everywhere else!

Brent P. Lanthier

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Deportivo La Coruña: A Cautionary Tale

deportivoSpanish football.  Fútbol español.   Over the last decade, Spain has become the game’s spiritual home.  And why not?  Its national team is the first side to be defend the European title while reigning as World Champions.   Out of the last 20 Champions League semi-finals, a Spanish team has been present for 11 of them.  In fact, Barcelona has reached the semis seven out of the last eight years, earning three titles in the process.   Sevilla and Atlético Madrid have each earned themselves a brace of UEFA Cup/Europa League trophies.   Spain has the best co-efficient in Europe and FIFA has the national team leading the world rankings by a country mile.

But as the nation itself teeters between austerity and economic ruin, so must Spanish football clean up its financial house.   Like the Spanish economy, many clubs have lived beyond their means, wanting the things that they haven’t got… and then paying the price in the long run.

There is likely no better cautionary tale than that of Deportivo La Coruña: a small club that found short-term success through front-office debt and backroom decisions.  Until the early 90’s, the Galicians were a yo-yo club.  But after securing top-flight football in 1991, they picked up two young Brazilians, Bebeto and Mauro Silva.  The pair were excellent for both club and country, with Bebeto earning the Pichichi in 1993, and then scoring three goals as Brazil won the 1994 World Cup.   A year later, the pair helped Los Blancoazuis win their first-ever Copa del Rey.

Roy Makaay was arguably Europe’s best player during his Depor days.

The club’s pinnacle came in 2000, when Diego Tristán and Roy Makaay led Deportivo to their first and only league title.  That win kicked off five straight seasons of Champions League football, culminating in 2004 where they were a penalty kick away from the finals.  If they kept eventual champions Porto from scoring from open play, who knows what they could have done against Monaco in Gelsenkirchen?  Tristán and Makaay won the Pichichi in 2002 and 2003, respectively, with Makaay earning the European Golden Boot as well.   Between 2000 and 2004, Deportivo La Coruña were Spain’s most consistent team in league football.

But after a series of mid-table finishes — and no money from Champions League football — the tiny team was in over its head financially.   Players begin to leave with the club still owing them wages.  (Albert Luque claims that he is still owed €2.1M.   He left in 2005).  Deportivo finally hit bottom in 2011 when they were sent back to the second division after a 20-year stay in the top flight.   “Superdépor” was no more.

The club came back on the bounce, but the signs were not good in 2012-2013.  The first half of the season was filled with multi-goal disasters: a 5-1 loss to Real Madrid; a 5-4 loss to Barcelona that could have been uglier; a promising start against Real Zaragoza that ended with the Aragonese side coming back to win 5-3; a disheartening 6-0 loss to Atletico Madrid.  By Christmas, Deportivo were dead last.

The team could find the back of the net and they spread the goals around.  But they couldn’t defend to save their life.  Manager José Luis Oltra was good enough to get them out of the second division, but he just wasn’t the man they needed for the Primera.   Just before New Year’s Eve, the club dumped Oltra and brought in former Portuguese international Domingos.  But the 43-year-old lasted just 41 days (a delicious parallel to Brian Clough at Leeds United, who later also overextended themselves for Champions League football and paid the price).  On March 10th, club brass brought in Galician “national” team manager Fernando Vázquez, who had coached Deportivo’s rivals Celta Vigo just five years before.

The Vázquez era began poorly, but it was to be expected.  His first four matches in charge were against Sevilla, Real Madrid, Barca and then an inexplicably successful Rayo Vallecano.   In those four matches, A Coruña went 0-3-1, giving up seven goals in the process.  It was their season in miniature.

But then came the Galician derby at the Riazor, a nasty affair between two clubs who were trying to claw their way off the bottom of the table.  A 3-1 victory over Vázquez’ old employers sparked a seven-game unbeaten streak, easing fears that Los Turcos were headed back to the Segunda after only one season.  And even though they lost two of their next three games, they were out of the drop zone heading into their last match.

Alas, it was not to be.  Deportivo dropped their final game 1-0 to Real Sociedad, a club hungry to taste European football for the first time since 2003-2004 (a season when Sociedad, Deportivo and Celta Vigo were all Champions League participants).  Meanwhile, down the AP-9, Vigo got past a middling Espanyol to survive another season in the top flight.  It hurt Deportivo to drop back down again.  But to do so while helping your biggest rival stay up? Galling.

It wasn’t the last of Deportivo’s woes.   In January, the club had applied for bankruptcy protection, with an estimated debt load of over €150M, more than a third of that owed to the Spanish government.    Panic set in among the players who demanded the club pay their outstanding wages.   A last-minute deal with creditors at the end of July — literally 15 minutes to midnight — saved them from getting dropped into the third division.  But that meant a) many players were out the door, including their two top scorers, and b) any player acquisitions had to be approved by debt administrators.

Eight of the league’s top-flight clubs — eight!!! — were in administration last season.  Twenty-four of Spain’s top two division teams have done the same over the last two years.  But obviously, not all of them were relegated.  Being a second-tier team makes things tough for Deportivo, who won’t be able to play the Big Two with their massive television audiences, unless they get them in the Cup.   But even though they have had a uneven start, it is still early and promotion is still a reasonable goal.

Bad business practices, player flight, unfair television deals: these aren’t unique to Deportivo La Coruña.   Clubs like Valencia, Villareal, Sociedad, Zaragoza have all been stung in the past few years (Sociedad were relegated after their last CL appearance and spent three years in Primera exile).   Nor are these problems unique to Spain.   But with several good players leaving what is supposed to be the best league in the world, and with so many eyes watching around the globe, Spain’s problems become embarrassingly obvious.

Deportivo’s problems are fixable.  So are Spain’s.  But it will be a long haul back to where they were just a few years ago.

Brent Lanthier

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