Tag Archives: David Villa

World’s finest come from too few teams

First of all, congratulations to Lionel Messi for capturing his second consecutive World Player of the Year award. Though Xavi and Andres Iniesta were also worthy finalists, little Leo’s tally of 58 goals in 54 games for Barca last year was simply too outstanding for voters to ignore. Congratulations also must go out to every player named to FIFA’s world XI, all of whom were outstanding at their respective positions last year:

GK: Iker Casillas (Real Madrid)

RB: Maicon (Inter)

CB: Lucio (Inter)

CB: Gerard Pique (Barcelona)

LB: Carles Puyol (Barcelona)

MF: Xavi (Barcelona)

MF: Andres Iniesta (Barcelona)

MF: Wesley Sneijder (Inter)

FWD: Lionel Messi (Barcelona)

FWD:  David Villa (Barcelona)

FWD: Cristiano Ronaldo (Real Madrid)

A look at the players, however, shows a disturbing pattern. All of the XI belong to just three clubs! And the way Real Madrid and Barcelona are tearing up La Liga this season, it isn’t beyond the realm of possibility that next season’s World XI will be comprised entirely of players from just those two Spanish squads.

We all love to watch soccer for various reasons, but I think everyone can agree that one of the most compelling reasons is the game’s unpredictability. If European soccer continues to be dominated by so few teams, then the game will begin to bore us all. Yawn. Wake me when Real and Barca make the Champions League final, will ya???

Hadi Zogheib

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Dutch Courage vs. Spanish Elan

Thirty days later and we’ve arrived here:  The Final Countdown.  One game, two European teams, both of whom have been stuck with the “choker” label in recent years. Half a billion people are expected to watch the final.  No pressure, boys.  Let’s ease into it then, with the consolation round!

Germany and Uruguay kept true to the form of past third-place games, with the goals coming fast and furious.  The match finished 3-2 Germany, though Uruguay’s Golden Boy Diego Forlan hit the crossbar in the last minute.  A new dawn has risen for German football — with a young team that should impress for years to come. Let’s hope the same can be said for little Uruguay. 

Goals from Forlan and Germany’s Thomas Muller bring both players to five. That makes them level with Wesley Sneijder and David Villa for the Golden Boot. Of course, Sneijder and Villa have one more shot to build on their tally. There hasn’t been this many players tied for the Golden Boot since Chile ’62… when six players shared the honour.

Blast from the Gen X past: U.S. star Alexei Lalas said he picked Netherlands-Uruguay and Spain-Germany in his bracket, with Holland beating Spain 3-2 in the final.  They used to burn Gingers at the stake for stuff like this…

According to FIFA’s foul and card count, the dirtiest team in the tournament will play the cleanest.  If you don’t which is which, I’ll throw out a hint: Mark Van Bommel.

The calls have been growing louder for Van Bommel’s head. The Dutchman has only picked up one yellow, despite video evidence showing some vicious attacks through the tournament.

Spanish eyes mustn’t have been smiling when they heard Howard Webb was officiating the final. Webb reffed the 2009 Champions League quarterfinal match between Barcelona and Van Bommel’s Bayern Munich. Watch Van Bommel’s vicious elbow on Lionel Messi. Webb played the advantage — which led to a Barca goal.  Trust me, the Spaniards haven’t forgotten…

Enjoy the final!

Brent Lanthier

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Maradona’s men meet their match

There were long faces and dark mutterings around the family home of my Futbol Guapa after her Albicelestes met another early exit from the World Cup Saturday, thrashed 4-0 by Germany’s young stars in the day’s first quarterfinal match, a victory that moves Die Mannschaft one step Klose (get it?) to the finals. Even the choripan didn’t taste quite as good afterward, tinged with the disappointment of a title drought that will now last another four years.

Much of the blame will be laid at the feet of the last man to lift a World Cup trophy in Argentinian colours. Diego Maradona, a firebrand striker in 1986 and now a portly coach, at least saved us all the decidedly unwelcome prospect of watching him run (waddle?) naked through the streets of Buenos Aires, which he’d promised to do if his team had won in South Africa. He may have inspired a similar pledge from Larissa Riquelme, which I salute, but Diego’s team selection and tactics were highly suspect. How handy would it have been for Argentina to have Javier Zanetti and Esteban Cambiasso to call into Maradona’s attack-minded lineup against Germany, helping to prop up a lonely Javier Mascherano in front of the back four, or replacing the highly suspect Nicolas Otamendi, whose foul led to Thomas Muller’s opening goal after just three minutes. So much for God’s will.

Having said that, these Germans are clearly a force to be reckoned with. The highest-scoring team at the tournament so far, they’ve recorded a trio of four-goal games. Muller, who’ll miss the semifinal through suspension, and fellow midfielders Mesut Ozil and Sami Khedira have turned the loss of Michael Ballack into more blessing than curse, while Miroslav Klose’s two goals against Argentina give him 14 in his World Cup career, one more than Pele, tied with German legend Gerd Muller and just one behind Ronaldo for the most ever. Clearly, coach Joachim Loew knows Germany is the pick of the crop.

Of course, to reach the final, the Germans still have to get past Spain, who withstood a strong and resolute Paraguay, with David Villa’s late goal proving decisive in a 1-0 final that denied us all to see a little bit more of the aforementioned Ms. Riquelme.

It wasn’t easy for Spain, up against a team who, as our Dr. Z has pointed out, knocked off Argentina, Brazil and Chile during CONMEBOL qualifying and were clearly not overawed by the prospect of facing the reigning European champions. Paraguay will probably feel a bit hard done by that they were denied the opening goal after Nelson Valdez scored shortly before half, only to have the strike disallowed because teammate Oscar Cardozo had been offside, and leapt for the ball as it came into the area.

The second half saw a bizarre sequence of penalties, with Gerard Pique using both hands to haul Cardozo to the ground, but Casillas saving and holding the shot. Seconds later, Villa was bundled over at the other end, but Xabi Alonso’s strike was ruled out because Spanish players had encroached into the penalty area. Replays later showed the same was true of Cardozo’s missed penalty, something that apparently eluded referee Carlos Batres of Guatemala. Alsono tried again, but Justo Villar made the stop, then escaped further discipline for crashing into Cesc Fabregas as he went after the rebound.

All that wackiness set the stage for an 83rd minute goal as wild as any at this tournament. Andres Iniesta left two Paraguayans in his wake with a driving run up the middle, laying the ball off for Pedro, whose shot rebounded off the post to Villa. The Golden Boot candidate also hit the post but got a more fortunate bounce, and the South Americans were sunk. Sure, Casillas was called on again to deny Roque Santa Cruz in the final minute, but Spain were otherwise comfortable in possession with the lead.

So, at a World Cup where we were once marveling at South American success and scratching our heads over European ineptitude, Uruguay is the last South American team standing as we head to the semis, with three European sides, Germany, the Netherlands and Spain, still going strong. You’d have to favour the Dutch against Uruguay in Tuesday’s first semifinal, while the Spain-Germany clash on Wednesday looks like a can’t-miss classic.

Ian Harrison

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Life’s a beach at the World Cup

Simon Hagens has (somewhat reluctantly) returned to Canada after two weeks in South Africa watching World Cup football and visiting family. In his final post, Simon returns to Cape Town for the playoff match between Spain and Portugal. Check out Simon’s complete adventures on Twitter to see more photos from his travels.

After a few days in Plettenberg Bay visiting cousin Nicola (where I enjoyed the beautiful setting, great people and Nicola’s pub), while my travel companions headed north for a safari in Kruger National Park, we were all back to Cape Town for our last game: Spain vs. Portugal. It would have been nice to see Cote D’Ivoire have the chance to take on Spain. Everywhere we went there was massive enthusiasm for the African teams, and Ghana is clearly now shouldering a lot of hopes. The Ghana victory over the USA was the talk all over South Africa.

On match day, the city had a great feel. Not like the wash of red and white, and spontaneous belting out of songs we’d seen before England games, more of a sense of camaraderie with flags from both countries everywhere and lively debates to win fence-sitters. The stadium filled up early, and the vuvuzela buzz started to build. The lack of fondness (mildly put) of the England fans for the vuvuzelas meant that we hadn’t experienced much more than a few random honks. Spanish and Portuguese fans, it seems, appreciate the vuvuzela a great deal more. Other than a few bouts of excessive ear damage, I actually came to appreciate them…sort of.

There was a huge banner inside the stadium that said “Brantford, Ontario supports Portugal.” There wasn’t nearly as much decoration for this game, so it stood out as a little odd. Go Brantford.

The game itself was a fantastic show, with plenty of spark and energy. Save for a few minutes early in second half, Spain was dominant, controlling the ball in the midfield and providing numerous entertaining attacks before David Villa’s breakthrough goal. The crowds were fantastic after, filling the streets and kicking their heels up. Cape Town is accommodating of revellers and treated us well, be it with great places to watch games while enjoying drinks and food, or finding locations to show off traditional Canadian dancing (wildly popular in South Africa). Full of regret, we wandered home to bed that night to prepare for the lengthy journey home.

The energy in South Africa, some super travelling companions and a lot of quality football made this an amazing trip, one well worth the effort. It was fantastic to be at the tournament, and there was a great vibe throughout the country. I’m already pencilling my next World Cup trip into my schedule.

Simon Hagens

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Holy spit! Spain beats Portugal

David Villa

They started the World Cup with a shock loss to Swizterland. But Spain, the reigning champions of Europe, have won all three matches since, and booked their berth in the quarterfinals today with a 1-0 victory over Iberian rivals Portugal, who barely got anything of merit out of Cristiano Ronaldo, the world’s most expensive footballer. David Villa, recently signed by Barcelona, struck the only goal of the match, firing his own rebound over Portuguese goalkeeper Eduardo, who had gone more than 330 minutes at this tournament without conceding before he was beaten.

Spain had controlled most of the possession in this entertaining encounter in Cape Town, the final World Cup match for our correspondent, but it was Portugal who stretched play and created the clear-cut chances in most of the first hour, save for a pair of early Spanish shots against Eduardo. But after Fernando Llorente came on for Fernando Torres and immediately created a headed chance, Spain were in the ascendancy. In the end, Iniesta found Xavi, whose clever backheel freed Villa for the shot and follow-up effort into the roof of the net that sent Portugal packing.

Cristiano Ronaldo

While he’s clearly one of the most special talents in the game today, I’m no fan of Ronaldo and was pleased to see Argentinian referee Hector Baldassi refusing to buy into the foul-seeking floppiness he’s become infamous for. The supremely talented but too-often petulant winger struggled to get touches, whined when the calls didn’t go his way and spat in the direction of a cameraman trailing him off the field at the final whistle. Good riddance.

Having said that, I’ve watched the replays of Ricardo Costa’s late elbow on Joan Capdevilla that resulted in a 88th minute red card from Baldassi, and can’t see why it was a direct red. A bit of dirty play acting from the Spaniard perhaps? I hope not.

Paraguay fan

Elsewhere, it was a day for cheering with two hands, which meant finding a new place to stash your Blackberry, if you were a fan of Paraguay, who became the fourth South American team to book their spot in the last eight by beating Japan 5-3 on penalties, the first game to be decided in that fashion at this World Cup. After a pretty dire 120 minutes, during which penalties always looked the most likely outcome, La Albirroja converted all five from the spot, with substitute Oscar Cardoza sliding home the clincher to put his team in the last eight for the first time, while Japan’s Yuichi Komano banged his effort off the crossbar, sending the Blue Samurai home in shameful defeat.

So, the quarters are set and we all get a couple of days to catch our breath before the Netherlands face Brazil in Port Elizabeth on Friday morning, with Ghana and Uruguay squaring off at Soccer City in Soweto later that day. Saturday morning brings Argentina vs. Germany in Cape Town, with Spain meeting Paraguay at Johannesburg’s Ellis Park Stadium in the late game. I’m going with Ghana and Brazil to emerge on one side of the draw, with Spain and Argentina getting through on the other side, even though by picking against Germany I’m ignoring the choice of Paul the Octopus. He knows his football – that match should be a cracker.

Ian Harrison

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Sweet 16 set in South Africa

Here’s the problem boys: You can’t score with your eyes closed

It was South American Colonies vs Former European Colonial Masters on the final day of group stage play at World Cup 2010, with Brazil facing Portugal to decide the top spot in Group G in one of the early games and Chile taking on Spain for first place in Group H in the late games.

As captivating as it looked on paper, the Brazil-Portugal clash didn’t really live up to the hype, finishing in a 0-0 draw that saw both teams go through, with Brazil securing first place. A shame, really, that this game didn’t come up earlier when both sides had more to play for…a draw was always on the cards given that it was enough to put the two teams into the knockout round.

Portugal have yet to concede at this tournament, but just as tellingly they haven’t put a goal past anyone other than North Korea. Good for them that they put seven past Kim Jong-Il’s boys, who may never be seen again after they bowed out with a 3-0 loss to Ivory Coast. Afterwards, Sven said goodbye to the Elephants, who were always going to need a big scoreline to keep going, but couldn’t pull it off . Sadly, the team many felt was Africa’s best but one that was consigned to a Group of Death for the second straight World Cup, finished one point behind Portugal, leaving Ghana as Africa’s lone representative in the second round.

David Villa’s cheeky goal pointed Spain into the second round

Later, while I was out covering a G20 protest march through downtown Toronto, Chile became the first South American team to taste defeat at this tournament, falling to Spain 2-1 thanks to an audacious first-half strike by David Villa and a well-struck shot by Andres Iniesta, and aided by an harsh sending off by Mexican referee Marco Rodriguez (the same guy who chased Australia’s Tim Cahill) after Marco Estrada clipped the heel of Fernando Torres, who disappointed again and was substituted early in the second half. Despite La Roja’s defeat, all five South American teams have reached the next stage, with a combined record to date of nine wins, one loss and five draws.

Finally, Switzerland’s bank-vault defence didn’t concede against Honduras in a 0-0 draw that gave the Central Americans their first and only point of the tournament, but did nothing to send the Swiss through.

So, it’s Brazil vs. Chile in an all-South American clash at Ellis Park Stadium in Jo’burg on the 28th, and Spain vs. Portugal in Cape Town on the 29th, our correspondent’s final match of his World Cup tour.

Ian Harrison

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Portugal win laugher, Spain & Chile also victorious

There were goals aplenty for Portugal in its match against North Korea, a 7-0 whitewash that eliminated Kim Jong-Il’s crew (probably only the second-biggest story in that country today) and all-but guaranteed that Ronaldo and company will be joining Brazil in the next round.  Even Didier Drogba’s firepower isn’t likely to be enough for Ivory Coast to overcome its goal difference woes and escape this Group of Death, another African casualty ready to be wheeled in to the World Cup morgue.

Wacky refereeing was the story in Chile’s 1-0 victory over 10-man Switzerland in the second match of the day as South American teams remained unbeaten. You might have thought, given the history of this Chile team and it’s appearance at the U-20 World Cup in Canada a few years back, that it would have been them who lost their cool when the cards started flying thick and fast, but it was Switzerland’s Volan Behrami who was sent packing, and Steve Von Bergen resorting to handbag tactics in the second half. The Swiss held their ground long enough to establish a World Cup record for minutes played without conceding, but couldn’t keep the hard-charging Chileans at bay. Even with six points, Marcelo Bielsa’s team is not guaranteed a berth in the knockout round, and will have to be more clinical in its finishing to survive Spain and, should it advance, the cream of Group G.

Finally, the aforementioned Spaniards turned on the style against Honduras in the late game, posting a 2-0 victory thanks to a brace from David Villa, who also missed a penalty. Fernando Torres failed to impress but this was more like it from the reigning European champions, who can still top their group by beating Chile in Pretoria on Friday, a game that could be an cracker. Coach Vincente Del Bosque sees room for improvement, with Villa’s behaviour one area that could be brushed up, but this should keep the critics at bay, which is more than can be said for Nigeria’s Sani Kaita. Really people, it’s only football.

Ian Harrison

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