Tag Archives: canada

Groan When You’re Winning

One more England miss, and they'll be stuck like that...

I’d like to put forth a very philosophical question that is almost Talmudic in the asking of it:

Is it right to criticize your team when it is winning?

I cheer for England.  I cheer for Canada. I cheer for Liverpool.  All three sides have taken myself and millions of others to the depths of despair… or at least, to the deep end of disappointment.  But all three have been winning lately.  So why am I seriously underwhelmed?

A fading member of England's "Golden Generation"

England pulled out the win on Tuesday and have almost booked their plane tickets to Poland/Ukraine.  But Wales could have beaten the Three Lions, as they played with purpose and aggression and without fear.  This was a different Dragons squad from six months ago, with Gary Speed giving the captain’s armband to 20-year-old Arsenal midfielder Aaron Ramsey.  Speed also had a fit Gareth Bale on the wing… and both players ran the hell out of the English backs all game.  My mate wondered aloud what the Welsh could have done if only Craig Bellamy hadn’t been suspended, and I had to agree.

England got the win but it wasn’t pretty: it was boring.  So I thought perhaps the country of my birth would play more exciting football than its colonial fathers.

How could I have been so naïve?

In fairness to the reader, I missed the first half.  In fairness to me… I missed nothing.  I turned on the match to see a Puerto Rican pitch that was in worse condition than the field at my under-funded elementary school.  Neither team could complete a relay of more than three passes, even if their lives depended on it (which in some nations, it would.  Colombia, I’m looking at you).  Canada went on to win 3-0.  But it still irks me that the Canucks have been forced to play tiny Caribbean nations in World Cup qualifiers while Third World backwaters like Honduras flourish internationally.

On the professional side, Liverpool has emerged from the financial ashes to spend over £100M pounds on fine young talent, most of it British.  Yet only two players — Luis Suarez and Charlie Adam — have been real game changers.  The club has no debt, they have a living legend as their manager, and the team has yet to lose a competitive match in this young season.  They have even won two major trophies in the last six years.  Like Fox Mulder, I want to believe… but a drunk and bitter Jiminy Cricket sits on my shoulder, nagging at me with doubt.

The reason for my skepticism comes down to the words of the great, er, scholar Dr. Phil who espouses this idiom: “The best predictor of future behaviour is past behaviour.”  All three sides have monumentally underwhelmed in the past.  Why should the near-future be any different?

Don Fabio: He no happy...

Volumes have been written about why England’s national side has not won a major tournament since the 1966 World Cup.  Spoiled players.  Too much pressure from the support and media.  Too many club fixtures.  Too many friendlies.  Yesterday, the manager added mental fragility to the list.

Meanwhile, Canada’s problem is that the players are simply not good enough.  Don’t get me wrong: they try.  They try hard.  But when you only have three players on the pitch who belong to top-flight clubs, the writing is on the wall.

DeRo keeps his World Cup dream alive

It blows my mind that Canada is one of the richest nations in the world, yet it is still not competitive in one of the biggest sports in the world.  I don’t buy the “ice hockey is everything” excuse.  Sweden, the Czech Republic, Russia and the US are all hockey powers and have all managed to find ways to build successful national soccer sides.  Sweden and Russia have thrown the “cold weather” excuse out the window as well.  The Canadian Soccer Association has a lot to answer for.

As for Liverpool, the club is only now recovering from two decades of Rip Van Winkle-itis: not paying attention to the New Business of football until it was too late.  The once-mighty club was too loyal to managers and players who did not perform, while failing to keep up with the Manchester Uniteds, Chelseas and Manchester Citehs until now.  Over the last eight months, Liverpool has spent over £100M.  Time will tell if it makes them a contender, or if it has bought more disappointment for their painfully loyal fans.

Perhaps I am being too persnickety, too willing to focus on the negatives in order to ease my mind when I am eventually let down.  But I’d like to think that I am making educated assumptions as I watch these teams play, seeing repeated errors and thinking,”this could be trouble.”

Maybe it’s just to cover my arse so when my team(s) finally lose, I can say, “I told you so.”   In the briefest of instances, I will have slid down the moral gradient from being “right” to just being “self-righteous”.

Because these days… isn’t that what being a football fan is all about?

Brent Lanthier

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Life’s a beach at the World Cup

Simon Hagens has (somewhat reluctantly) returned to Canada after two weeks in South Africa watching World Cup football and visiting family. In his final post, Simon returns to Cape Town for the playoff match between Spain and Portugal. Check out Simon’s complete adventures on Twitter to see more photos from his travels.

After a few days in Plettenberg Bay visiting cousin Nicola (where I enjoyed the beautiful setting, great people and Nicola’s pub), while my travel companions headed north for a safari in Kruger National Park, we were all back to Cape Town for our last game: Spain vs. Portugal. It would have been nice to see Cote D’Ivoire have the chance to take on Spain. Everywhere we went there was massive enthusiasm for the African teams, and Ghana is clearly now shouldering a lot of hopes. The Ghana victory over the USA was the talk all over South Africa.

On match day, the city had a great feel. Not like the wash of red and white, and spontaneous belting out of songs we’d seen before England games, more of a sense of camaraderie with flags from both countries everywhere and lively debates to win fence-sitters. The stadium filled up early, and the vuvuzela buzz started to build. The lack of fondness (mildly put) of the England fans for the vuvuzelas meant that we hadn’t experienced much more than a few random honks. Spanish and Portuguese fans, it seems, appreciate the vuvuzela a great deal more. Other than a few bouts of excessive ear damage, I actually came to appreciate them…sort of.

There was a huge banner inside the stadium that said “Brantford, Ontario supports Portugal.” There wasn’t nearly as much decoration for this game, so it stood out as a little odd. Go Brantford.

The game itself was a fantastic show, with plenty of spark and energy. Save for a few minutes early in second half, Spain was dominant, controlling the ball in the midfield and providing numerous entertaining attacks before David Villa’s breakthrough goal. The crowds were fantastic after, filling the streets and kicking their heels up. Cape Town is accommodating of revellers and treated us well, be it with great places to watch games while enjoying drinks and food, or finding locations to show off traditional Canadian dancing (wildly popular in South Africa). Full of regret, we wandered home to bed that night to prepare for the lengthy journey home.

The energy in South Africa, some super travelling companions and a lot of quality football made this an amazing trip, one well worth the effort. It was fantastic to be at the tournament, and there was a great vibe throughout the country. I’m already pencilling my next World Cup trip into my schedule.

Simon Hagens

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Finally, something to showcase

With its billion dollar security tab, widespread road closures, potentially violent protests and forced removal of Blue Jays games, there’s not much to like about the G20 summit in Toronto this month. Plenty of places are just shutting down when the leaders, followers and crazies show up, leaving little for the city to show off. At least, with news that the visiting dignitaries are seeking out places to keep up to date with the goings on from South Africa, the city finally has something to show off; a pub for every leader. In multi-cultural, soccer-mad and bar-heavy Toronto, everyone should be able to find a slice of home.

No idea what this means to the security machine, or to the quality of the meetings, which could suffer if David Cameron refuses to budge from the Queen and Beaver while Nicolas Sarkozy sets up shop at Le Saint Tropez and Silvio Berlusconi saunters down College Street chatting up the ladies.

Ian Harrison, with an assist from the Red Flash.

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Ay Dios! Please no!

diego maradona Diego Maradona is threatening to strip naked and run through the streets of Buenos Aires if Argentina win the World Cup. Shudder. Don’t get excited just because you dismantled Canada 5-0 on the weekend, buddy. There’ll be plenty tougher tests to come…you know, as tough as it would be for all of us to see you tango down the road in your birthday suit.

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