Tag Archives: cameroon

Brazilian Relief, Mexican Rain Dance

world cup opener

And so it begins… the hype, the glory, the parade of flags tied to foot-long plastic flag posts, perched on the partially-open windows of cars going by.

Brazil vs. Croatia

Neymar's team mates help him find his contact lens...

Neymar’s team mates help him find his contact lens…

After the requisite interpretative dance numbers, and some C-list celebrities singing their iTunes best-seller, the actual football got under way.  Brazil’s debut was testy-testy.  Marcelo looked liked he’d come home to find his flat ransacked after his own goal allowed Croatia to go up 1-0.  The Valtreni played very un-Croatia-like, sending the ball hither and thither, instead of trying to hold onto the ball in the middle of the pitch.  That barrage is what caused confusion in front of the Brazilian net, and now Croatia is on top.

But hang on, that’s not how the narrative’s supposed to go.  Enter Brazil’s front four, who pulled the Croatians onto the edges, allowing Neymar to find the space in the middle.  That lead-up to his first goal was a good piece of effort with each Brazilian player seeming to lose the ball before retaking it from their defender and eventually getting it to the young Barcelona man.  It was a nice string of play but frankly, Croatia’s keeper Pletikosa should have stopped it.  He might have saved the penalty as well, had Neymar’s blast not been so powerful, and he was definitely in position to save Oscar’s nice little poke… he was just too slow. 3-1 Brazil.

Mexico vs. Cameroon

Las gotas de lluvia caen sobre mi cabeza mucho

Las gotas de lluvia caen sobre mi cabeza mucho

The city of Natal gave us a nice look at the weather patterns of an equatorial country.  The rain fell in sheets as Mexico took on Cameroon.  Apparently, the players aren’t the only one with a case of nerves as the officials wrongly took three goals away from the Mexicans.  Giovani dos Santos was excellent in the number 10 role, outshining the central striker until the second half (Spurs fans thinking, “Where was that guy when he played for us?”).  GDS and Porto’s Hector Herrera linked up well; they were all over a disorganized Cameroonian side who looked like they didn’t even want to be there.  When the Africans did challenge, it was up the left (against Rodriguez and Aguilar, who are not the speediest of defenders) but the efforts tended to come to naught.   So it was left to the man left up front, Oribe Peralta, to finally break the deadlock.  Peralta started in place of Javier Hernandez, probably because he has now scored nine goals in his last seven games for Mexico, while Chicharito has had a season to forget.

Now Mexico faces Brazil in Fortaleza on Tuesday, while Cameroon takes on Croatia in the sticky air of Manaus the next day.   If Brazil still have the jitters, and Mexico can grab even a point, then El Tri are suddenly in the mix.  Meanwhile, the Cameroonians look disinterested right now, but the Croats may struggle in the rain forest’s oppressive heat.

Brent P. Lanthier

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World Cup 2014 Preview: Groups A & B

brazuca

It’s finally here: the high holiday for soccer geeks, er, fans like myself.  The World Cup is one event that lives up to its hype, and the world is really watching.  You look at the field and you see that everything is as it should be this year.  Every nation that deserves to be in Brazil will be there, starting June 12.  Here’s At The Rail’s predictions.  I’ll go through two groups a day, finishing on Thursday with my bracket.

GROUP A

Can Neymar and Brazil live up to the hype?

Can Neymar and Brazil live up to the hype?

Let’s get this out of the way right now: there is little reason to think that Brazil won’t win the whole damn thing.  After demolishing the World and European champions in last year’s Confederations Cup, A Selação was dismissed in some circles because they didn’t face a qualifying campaign (because they are the home nation).  But if you look at this side’s roster, there are no weak spots.   Brazil’s national team has 35 titles from Europe’s Big Five leagues, and 10 players have Champions League medals (along with five players with Copa Libertadores gongs).  Fifteen players are returning from last year’s Confederations win… as is World Cup-winning manager Big Phil Scolari.  Anything less than the World Cup trophy will be viewed as failure.  CHAMPIONS

How far can Modric lead Croatia?

How far can Modric lead Croatia?

Meanwhile, Croatia are back in the tournament after missing out on South Africa, and then getting knocked out in the European Championship by eventual champions, Spain.  Several veterans are travelling to Brazil, including captain Darijo Srna, Danijel Pranjić, Vedran Ćorluka (really?!? Ćorluka?!?) and Ivica Olić… players who have all seen better days.  But Luka Modrić is coming off a Champions League win, Ivan Rakitić won the Europa League with Sevilla (and could be on his way to Barcelona), Mario Mandžukić came second in the Bundesliga scoring race while securing another league title, and Dejan Lovren played so well for Southampton that he’s now on the shopping list of several big clubs.   They’ll progress, where they’ll likely meet Spain again.  ROUND OF 16

It could be frustrating tourney for Chicharito

It could be frustrating tourney for Chicharito

Mexico no longer have their dark-horse caché anymore… in fact, they have no caché whatsoever.  Winning only two of 10 games in the CONCACAF hexagonal qualifiers, El Tri‘s performances provoked a national crisis when they lost on the last day.  Their collective hides were only saved by a last-gasp win by arch-enemies USA in Panama.   The Mexicans are led by mercurial defender Rafael Márquez, with bullet-headed Carlos Salcido marauding around the pitch.  Javier Hernandez had a terrible year with a terrible Manchester United side, so he may be motivated to rediscover his scoring touch, especially since he is only five away from surpassing the legendary Cuauhtémoc Blanco… but don’t bet on it.  THREE AND OUT

Wham, bam, thank you Sam...

Wham, bam, thank you Sam…

Cameroon appear to have more problems than just football.  At the time of writing, the Indomitable Lions  had failed to depart for Brazil over a pay dispute.  This is not the first time this has happened… but it points to a problem where players’ heads aren’t where they should be.   No matter: this is not the golden generation of a decade ago.   While Stéphane Mbia had a decent season with Sevilla, Alex Song has spent much of his time at Barcelona on the bench, and Samuel Eto’o has left Chelsea without any silverware to show for his short time in England.  Most of the other squad members ply their trades for middling teams in the European leagues.  Cameroon haven’t reached the knockout stages in quarter-century.  That streak should remain intact.  THREE AND OUT.

 

GROUP B

Nine of these 11 players have returned for the World Cup.

Nine of these 11 players have returned for the World Cup.

Destiny awaits for Spain. No team has retained the World Cup since Brazil did it in 1962… and in all four World Cups held in South America, it was a Sudamericano nation that won.  But Spain are no ordinary side.  This is a team retaining 18 players from its Euro 2012 victory, 15 players from its World Cup win in South Africa… and 12 players from a thunderous night in Vienna in 2008.   Twenty-two Champions League medals sit in the homes of this Spanish side… and despite advancing age, they don’t seem to be slowing down.  Spain is Football Heaven right now, with the World Cup, European Championship, Champions League trophy and Europa League trophy all residing in España.   Win the World Cup and they are the best football team, ever.  Period.  Fall a little short, and no one will begrudge them anything.  They’ll lose but only because it’s Brazil… in Brazil.  FINALIST.

Sanchez: he runs, he scores.  'Nuff said.

Sanchez: he runs, he scores. ‘Nuff said.

Chile have been one of the world’s most exciting sides to watch over the last few years.   Put that squarely in the laps of Alexis Sánchez and Arturo Vidal.   Sánchez runs riot for both Barça and La Roja, and, at 25 years old, is quickly moving up Chile’s all-time caps and goals charts.  Meanwhile Vidal is the pivot for this team, trying to do what he does for Italian champions, Juventus: score goals or set them up.  This will be a team that attacks, attacks, attacks… all the way to a match-up with fellow South Americans, Brazil, in the next round.   ROUND OF 16.

Oh sure, they're all friends NOW...

Oh sure, they’re all friends NOW…

A finalist in the last World Cup, Netherlands are a shadow of their former selves.  While Mark van Bommel called it quits in 2010, along with his father-in-law-cum-manager Bert Van Marwijk, Van Bommel’s fellow midfield hooligan Nigel de Jong returns.   Arjen Robben has had another fine campaign for Bayern Munich, and Klaas-Jan Huntelaar overcame injury in the season’s first-half to score 12 goals for Schalke.  But who else is there? Jonathan De Guzmán was stuck in Wales and Leroy Fer played on an awful Norwich City side.  Meanwhile, veterans Wesley Sneijder and Dirk Kuyt have been toiling away in the Turkish Süperlig.  Robin van Persie will chomping at the bit to overcome a forgetable season at Manchester United.   But then there is the elephant in the room: how long before the Dutch side self-destructs, turning to frustration against the opposition, referees and ultimately, each other?  THREE AND OUT

Don't get too comfy, lads.

Don’t get too comfy, lads.

Australia, Australia, Australia… we love ya.  But you are not going to make major inroads in this group.   FIFA’s lowest-ranked team in the tournament, the Aussies have the same problem as every other English-speaking former colony in the world: a national side made up mostly of players who play in their small national leagues, or at Europe’s lesser lights (Canada/USA/New Zealand/Jamaica… I’m looking at you).  Crystal Palace’s Mile Jedinak is probably this star of this outfit, the only outfielder to play in one of Europe’s Big Five.  Veterans Tim Cahill and Mark Bresciano return from far-flung clubs to help out… but this is just a brief stay for the Socceroos.  Australia 2022!  THREE AND OUT

Brent P. Lanthier

Up next: Groups C & D  (Shocking, I know)

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Arrivederci Italia


For the first time since 1974, Italy has crashed out of the World Cup in the group stage, losing a 3-2 decision to Slovakia today to finish bottom of Group F, a shocking fall for the defending champion Azzurri. Coach Marcello Lippi said his team “played with fear in their legs and their hearts” throughout their brief stay at the tournament, perhaps never more than today when, for long stretches, Slovakia bossed the game and created the bulk of the chances.

This might have been the most dramatic game at the World Cup so far, with the stakes so high for both teams and the goals coming thick and fast in the final 10 minutes. But aging Italy, hampered by the loss of  goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon and without Andrea Pirlo for the first two matches, never really woke up until then, and it cost them even worse than failing to beat New Zealand in their previous match. Slovakia’s players, notably the keeper, were guilty of some serious time wasting in the dying moments, with the match threatening to drag on longer than a certain Wimbledon epic, but they held on for a famous win.

As for the Kiwis, they pulled off another draw, their third in as many matches. For a team that was expected to be cannon fodder at this World Cup, New Zealand can hold their heads high, but they’re still packing their bags after a 0-0 snoozer against Paraguay, with the South Americans moving on.

The late games saw the Netherlands outclass Cameroon 2-1, the first time a Dutch team has won all three group stage matches at the World Cup (and extending an unbeaten streak that began with an undefeated qualifying campaign). Arjen Robben returned to the Dutch team after missing victories over Denmark and Japan. On the other side, Paul LeGuen resigned as coach of the Indomitable Lions after losing all three matches and could be heading Down Under for his next job.

Finally, Japan bent a pair of free kicks into the Danish net and, after conceding a second-half penalty, sealed it with a late third goal to earn a 3-1 win that dumped Denmark out. Even if their continent won’t be cheering for them, Japan are moving on, and doing so for the first time on foreign soil.

With all eyes focussed on South Africa, this seemed a good time for Chelsea to hand Nicolas Anelka a contract extension. Wonder whether there’s a behaviour clause? Does Stamford Bridge have a swear jar?

So, the Netherlands take on upstart Slovakia on Monday, with Paraguay taking on the Japanese on Tuesday, with just four places left in the round of 16.

Ian Harrison

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I was saying ‘Boo-urns’


If they haven’t already drowned themselves at the bottom of a swimming pool filled with Stella, I’m hoping Brent and Kevin can add some analysis on England’s thoroughly lacklustre 0-0 draw with Algeria today that leaves the Three Lions teetering on the brink of failing to advance out of what was generally considered to be an easy Group C.

Wayne Rooney, whose first touch was dreadful all game and hasn’t been behaving himself all week, took umbrage at the boos directed at the team as they trudged off to think about facing group leaders Slovenia, who were fortunate to hold on for a 2-2 draw with the Sash-and-burners of Team USA when the referee inexplicably disallowed a goal by former Toronto FC player Maurice Edu. As for England, even Algeria were surprised at how crap they played, which was poorly enough that one fan felt compelled to break into the dressing room and have a go at the players. Not sure whether it was Prince Harry or William.

About the only good thing to happen all day was Serbia’s 1-0 victory over Germany, in which Miroslav Klose was sent off for a second bookable offence and Lukas Podolski had a penalty saved. Turns out not every opponent is as old and rubbish as Australia’s Socceroos. The result is a big break for injury-wracked Ghana, who face Australia on Saturday, while the Group E lads get it on with the Netherlands playing Japan and Cameroon facing Denmark.

Ian Harrison

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Dr. Z’s World Cup Predictions: Group E

Dentist by day, football prognosticator by night, our own Dr. Hadi Zogheib is scouting out each group at World Cup 2010 and predicting first round scores and standings. Here’s what the good doctor expects in Group E:

Netherlands:  With all the talk about Spain, Brazil, Argentina, and England, it seems the Dutch have been overlooked.  As I wrote a few weeks ago, injuries were threatening to derail their tournament aspirations, but most of the players have recovered in time for the big show.  Goalkeeping and defence are a little questionable, but with Dirk Kuyt, Robin Van Persie, Rafael Van der Vaart, and the sensational Wesley Sneijder and Arjen Robben, anything less than a semifinal showing will be considered a big disappointment.

Japan:  Perennial Asian powerhouse Japan will feel a little better going into the competition having played England very tough in a 2-1 loss.  Speedy and crafty, the Japanese must tighten up in defence if they hope to progress out of the group stage.  They’ll need some magic from former Celtic midfielder and free kick wizard Shunsuke Nakamura along the way.  The Japanese may also be bolstered by the fact that they have a stellar record in recent years against African countries, going 5-0-1 since 2007.

Cameroon:  And the award for tightest uniforms go to… but I digress.  The West Africans will be hoping to repeat the success of Italia ’90, and much of the pressure will fall on the captain’s shoulders.  Former great Roger Milla stirred up a little controversy recently, criticizing Samuel Eto’o for playing great for club but not country.  Perhaps he was looking to light a fire under the Inter superstar: time will tell if it worked. As a big fan of la Liga, I must also mention the play of Espanyol goalkeeper Kameni, who perhaps single handedly helped his club avoid relegation with his sensational play this season.

Denmark:  The most underrated team in the World Cup, the Danes beat out Hungary, Sweden, and mighty Portugal to win their qualification group.  Meticulously organized and solid (though not spectacular) at every position, this may be the team to pick as the darkhorse to go deep in the tournament.  That is, if the maddeningly inconsistent Nicolas Bendtner decides to play consistently for a change.

Predicted Results:

Netherlands 2-1 Denmark

Cameroon 2-0 Japan

Netherlands 3-1 Japan

Cameroon 1-1 Denmark

Denmark 2-0 Japan

Cameroon 0-2 Netherlands

Group Standings:

Netherlands  9 pts

Denmark 4 pts

Cameroon 4 pts

Japan 0 pts

Related: Dr. Z doubts the host’s chances in Group A, expects Greece’s defence-first philsophy will pay off in Group B, predicts an opening-round sweep for England in Group C, and expects a three-way dogfight in Group D.

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England’s Tears: Italy ’90

By Kevin Hoggard

Passionate Italians, close shaves, tight shorts, blood, sweat and a crying Englishman… and that was just my summer job at the docks.  Oh yeah, and there was also a World Cup to wile away our summer evenings.

England win, England win, England win!  Yes, you read that correctly.  We came away from Italia 90 with silverware.  The boys lined up, the medals were distributed, Sir Bobby bowed and gave a speech and finally the Fair Play trophy was ours.

But even more pointless was the 3rd and 4th place “consolation” playoff.  The lads had just lost a gruelling semi-final but couldn’t even pack their bags to go and sit on the beach for a week.  They had to play what amounted to a friendly against disgruntled opponents… with neither team wanting to be there.  And since you asked: we lost that as well.

England had set up base in Cagliari on the island of Sardinia.  They had the paradox of struggling through qualification without conceding a goal.  At the World Cup, they found themselves drawn in a tough group.  The Netherlands, Republic of Ireland and Egypt were the teams tasked with removing the Three Lions from their Italian sojourn.

Sir Bobby had pretty much stuck by the aging squad that had taken him to the quarterfinals in Mexico.  Peter Shilton was the wrong side of 40 and would go on to get his 125th cap during the tournament.  Still in the team were Butcher, Robson, Waddle, Lineker, Beardsley and Barnes.  The youngest player in the squad was Paul Gascoigne.  He would go on to become the iconic figure of Italia ‘90 and then later become an alcoholic, eventually sectioned under the mental health act.  Swings and roundabouts!

England flattered to deceive in the group stages.  For the first 10 days, I sat in my bedsit, watching a 19” TV, drinking cups of tea and controlling my tightening sphincter — quite surprising considering my summer job.

We looked listless in the opening game.  Lineker opened the scoring on eight minutes but Ireland fought back to equalise in the second half.  The result: 1-1.  Our next match was Holland.  Bobby switched to a sweeper system and we actually outplayed the Dutch… but a goalless stalemate ensued.  Bryan Robson would hobble off the pitch, never to return.

So we needed a result in our final game yet again.  All that remained between us and a move back to the mainland were the Egyptians.  It was a struggle, but in the 64th minute Gazza would swing in a beautiful free kick that was met by the balding ginger pate of Mark Wright.

It was enough to make us group winners with Ireland bizarrely joining us in second, thanks to the drawing of lots.  And despite losing the lot draw, Holland would also make it through as a best third place team!  I’m surprised they didn’t let Egypt join in the party as well. Why send anyone home?!?

The win put the team (and our hordes of marauding hooligans) in Bologna to face the Belgians.  Belgium was a limited side but we had hardly sparkled.  During a pretty dour 90 minutes, the closest anyone came was Enzo Scifo.  He struck an incredible swerving 30-yard shot.  It had Shilton beat all ends up but luckily for us, it struck the inside of the post and rebounded out to safety.

Into extra time now and both teams were looking tired.  With one minute to go before the penalty shoot-out, Gazza went on a run and was fouled mid-way through the Belgian half.  We packed the box and Gazza clipped a looping ball into the area.  You’d think with that sort of delivery, the Belgians would be able to at least challenge for the ball… but somehow Platt found the ball dropping to him unmarked.  With his back to goal, he spun and hit a tremendous volley over his shoulder and into the back of the net.  Blessed relief!

The next match was one of my favourites in England’s World Cup history.  Cameroon had won a tough group that contained Romania and Argentina.  They dispatched Colombia in the second round, setting up a quarterfinal showdown with England in Napoli.

I love African’s football mentality.  They’ll probably never win anything in my lifetime but they are always fun to watch.  They are incredibly naive at the back.  They play like school kids.  Nobody wants to defend and everybody wants to go up front to score.  This attitude would lead to an incredibly open game with chances flying at either end.

Platt again opened the scoring with a fairly simple English goal.  Work the wing, cross the ball, head down into the net.  1-0 at the half.  But Cameroon looked good and I was as nervous as a choirboy told to stay behind by the vicar.  Gascoigne made a rash challenge in the area.  Penalty!  It was dispatched with much aplomb and it would be the first of three penalties on the day.

Roger Milla was the face of Cameroon.  He was about 80 when the World Cup was played but he oozed class.  It was he that would slide in Ekeke on 65 minutes to clip the ball over Shilton.  How was this slipping away from us?  Surely we can’t be denied a place in the semi-final by Cameroon, can we?

With seven minutes to go – and with thoughts of spending the rest of the summer playing Kick Off on my Atari ST racing through my head — England were spared by a scything challenge on Lineker in the area.  Penalty number two.  Lineker picked himself up and calmly sent the keeper the wrong way.

Cameroon carved chance after chance out as the game went into extra time.  We looked tired… but the youngest man on the team was still playing strong.  Gazza bustled through his own half and put a slide rule pass into Lineker’s stride.  One on one with the keeper, Lineker was again taken down.  Gary dusted himself down and drilled it as hard as he could straight down the middle.  What a game! 3-2, bring on the Germans!

Deutschland had gone through Poland, Belgium and France before reaching England. Hang on…sorry… wrong tournament.  The Germans had topped an easy group and then beat the Netherlands and the Czechs to get to this stage.


Gazza’s tears for Sir Bobby echo those from Italy, 19 years before.

Twenty years on and it’s still hard for me to talk about the day.  After watching it again for this piece, it still makes me tingle when Lineker equalizes. It makes me ill when Gazza cries and Waddle blazes the hopes of a nation over the German bar.  We outplayed the Germans but as ever, they prevailed.  No words can describe the gut wrenching feeling of that loss.

England lost in a penalty shoot-out on the day.  It was the first one that we, as Englishmen, had been a part of.  We would go on to win one against Spain in the 96 Euros. But then losses to Germany, Argentina and Portugal twice — all by the dreaded spot kick — would see us eliminated from almost every major tournament in this agonising manner.  Six out of seven times we have lost.  Whatever happens in South Africa this year, the one thing I can guarantee you:

No Englishman wants us to endure the agony of that 12-yard kick again.

In the last 20 years, Kevin hasn’t been able to so much as look at a piece of schnitzel… and, for some reason, jumps at the sound of a foghorn.

Up next: The Tournament That Wasn’t.

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